Saturday, July 31, 2010

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Monday, July 26, 2010


  • Step 1
    Original Image
    Original Image

    Open your saved file in GIMP. The accompanying image is a five-candle candelabra that we created specifically for using as an image for home movie titles.

  • Step 2
    Waves Control Frame
    Waves Control Frame

    Under the FILTERS menu, select ANIMATION and WAVES to open up the waves control panel. Notice you can choose the amount of frames for your animation. More frames will create a longer animation. Since we can eventually change the timing of this animation in our video editing program, we selected 10 frames. This will create a relatively short sequence. We can also adjust the amplitude and wavelength for the animation. You can experiment with these to change the nature of the wave.

  • Step 3
    Image Window after Rendering
    Image Window after Rendering

    Once you click OK, the program will begin rendering. When it is finished you will see a still image of the effect in the image window. To view the animation, choose FILTERS/ANIMATION and PLAYBACK

  • Step 4
    Text Control Panel
    Text Control Panel

    Since we want to make this into a movie title, we want to add some text. Add the text AFTER creating the animation otherwise your text will also be wavy. Select the Text tool and click on the image where you want to insert the text.

  • Step 5
    Edit Text
    Edit Text

    Select color and font, color and other text attributes as you would when adding text to any image. In this case, we wanted the font color to come close to the color of the candlelight.

  • Step 6
    Final Image
    Final Image

    The image is now the way we want it with the text in the proper place for the final frame.

  • Step 7
    Save the Image
    Save the Image

    To save the image, select SAVE AS from the FILE menu. Expand the file types. There are a couple of animation types to choose from. We will save this as a GIF animation and therefore select GIF from the file type menu.

  • Step 8
    Export File
    Export File

    Once you click EXPORT you will get another dialog box. You MUST choose SAVE AS ANIMATION or you will only save a still image. You can preview your final image by just double-clicking on the saved file.



  • Read more: How to Make an Animation Using GIMP Freeware | eHow.com http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:L7NMHhvclOwJ:www.ehow.com/how_2173141_animation-using-gimp-freeware.html+how+to+create+a+text+animation+steps+free+download&cd=9&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=in#ixzz0unlG1eWb

    Sunday, July 25, 2010


    Excellent 3-D action Wow and I like the points scoring attacks Great Color and Nice Background all that is missing is the Zoink Zoink sound when the Dude hits the Snake! Lol 5/5 Great Work.
    Once inside the program, click the “Upload Photo” button and choose the blank file from your hard drive. When your file has been uploaded into Picnik, you will see it (although barely, because it’s a white image on an almost-white background) in an interface that has five tabs across the top. Choose the “Create” tab.

    Picnik_clip_art_size Once inside the “Create” tab, the button you will use the most will be “Shapes.” (If you want to add text to your clip art, you’ll also eventually want to use the “Text” button too.) To begin designing your own clip art, choose “Shapes” and then scroll to see all the available images on the left. Keep in mind that all the images in black can be altered to appear in any color, so at this point all you’ll care about is choosing a shape. Click on an image to insert the shape onto your white “canvas” .jpg, then drag the corner with your mouse to make it the size you want. (See the image above.)

    There are a variety of Picnik features you can use to alter your clip art. They require a little getting used to, but once you’re familiar, you’ll probably love playing with them. Here are some of the main features:

    Picnik_clip_art_adjust_color
    Change colors by moving the white circle that appears on the color spectrum.

    picnik clip art adjust fade
    “Fade” the color by sliding the Fade bar. This not only mutes the color, it allows it to “float” over other colors and create layers. (See the butterflies and bird clip art above for examples.)

    Picnik_clip_art_rotate
    You can insert an image on top of another image (in this case, a flower on top of a circle) and then rotate it. To rotate, hover your mouse over the circle that sticks out at the top of the image. When a circle with two arrows appears, move your mouse to rotate the image in the direction you want it to turn.

    Picnik_clip_art_flip
    To create a mirror image, as I did with the flower above, just add another flower, then click the “Flip” button on the left. You can also flip vertically by clicking the “Flip ” button on the right.

    Picnik_clip_art_text
    To add text to your image, click the “Text” button at the top of the “Create” screen, then type in the word(s) you want. Then, choose a typeface by clicking on it and size the type by sliding the “Size” bar. You can also fade the text color by sliding the “Fade” bar. If you want your text to appear on two or more rows, you’ll have to go through this process separately for each row.

    Sunday, July 18, 2010

    Disney ,
    The world of Disney probably was a place of wonder for many people when they were young. The famous and iconic comic characters such as Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck are amongst some of the adorable companions that you grew up with in your childhood. If you are a loyal fan of these cartoon characters and want to immerse yourself again in the magic world of Disney ,
    The world of Disney probably was a place of wonder for many people when they were young. The famous and iconic comic characters such as Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck are amongst some of the adorable companions that you grew up with in your childhood. If you are a loyal fan of these cartoon characters and want to immerse yourself again in the magic world of Disney ,

    Tuesday, July 13, 2010

    Sunday, July 11, 2010

    Thursday, July 8, 2010

    Sunday, July 4, 2010

    Friday, July 2, 2010